Tue. May 28th, 2024

The world of role-playing games (RPGs) has come a long way since its inception. From tabletop games to video games, RPGs have become a beloved pastime for many. But the question remains, was Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) really the first RPG? The answer is not as simple as it seems. Join us as we delve into the fascinating history of RPGs and explore the origins of this beloved genre. We’ll take a look at the earliest RPGs and examine how they evolved over time, ultimately leading to the creation of D&D. So grab your dice and get ready to explore the rich history of RPGs.

Quick Answer:
The origins of role-playing games (RPGs) can be traced back to the 1970s with the creation of Dungeons & Dragons (D&D), which is often considered the first RPG. However, D&D was not the first game to incorporate elements of role-playing. Early examples of RPGs can be found in tabletop games such as tabletop miniatures games, wargames, and board games that involved players taking on different roles and assuming various personas. The concept of RPGs as we know it today, with its emphasis on character development, storytelling, and collaboration, emerged with the creation of D&D and has since influenced the development of countless other RPGs.

The Birth of Tabletop Role-Playing Games

Early RPGs in the 1970s

The 1970s saw the emergence of the first tabletop role-playing games (RPGs), paving the way for the modern RPGs we know today. Some of the earliest RPGs included:

Chainmail

  • Developed by Gary Gygax and Jeff Perren in 1971, Chainmail was a miniatures wargame that incorporated fantasy elements, such as magic and mythical creatures.
  • It used a simple dice-rolling system and focused on tactical gameplay, laying the groundwork for the more complex systems that would come later.

Dungeons & Dragons

  • Released in 1974 by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) is often credited as the first true RPG.
  • The game combined elements from Chainmail, medieval fantasy literature, and tabletop wargaming, allowing players to assume the roles of characters in a fictional world and interact with one another through the storytelling of a game master.
  • D&D introduced many of the core concepts that would become synonymous with the RPG genre, such as character levels, experience points, and skill checks.

The Fantasy Game

  • Created by Dave Arneson in 1972, The Fantasy Game was a precursor to D&D and focused on open-ended exploration and roleplaying rather than the more structured gameplay of its successor.
  • Players created their own characters and set out on adventures in a shared world, with the game master guiding the story and controlling non-player characters.
  • While The Fantasy Game did not have a formal ruleset, it laid the groundwork for many of the concepts that would later be refined and popularized by D&D.

Other Early RPGs

  • In addition to Chainmail, Dungeons & Dragons, and The Fantasy Game, other early RPGs from the 1970s included:
    • Warhammer Fantasy Battle (1983)
    • Traveller (1977)
    • Call of Cthulhu (1981)
    • Tunnels & Trolls (1975)

These early RPGs demonstrated a growing interest in fantasy and science fiction, as well as a desire for more interactive and immersive storytelling experiences. As the popularity of these games grew, so did the number of new RPGs that followed in their footsteps, paving the way for the diverse and vibrant RPG landscape we see today.

The Evolution of Game Mechanics

While Dungeons & Dragons is widely considered the first modern tabletop role-playing game (RPG), it was not the first game to incorporate elements of role-playing. The concept of role-playing dates back to the early 20th century, and several games can be identified as precursors to the modern RPG. These games, while different from modern RPGs, helped lay the groundwork for the mechanics and gameplay that would come to define the genre.

The Use of Imagination and Collaborative Storytelling

Early role-playing games focused on imagination and collaborative storytelling. One such game was “Theatre of the Mind,” created by the French author and philosopher Bernard Hareau in the 1920s. The game involved players taking on the roles of characters in a fictional story, which was developed collaboratively by the players and the game master. The players would describe their actions and decisions, while the game master would describe the consequences and develop the plot.

The Development of Game Mechanics

In the 1970s, the development of game mechanics for role-playing games began to take shape. Games like “Dungeons & Dragons” (1974) and “Traveller” (1977) introduced more structured gameplay, including rules for character creation, combat, and problem-solving. These games allowed players to engage in imaginative play, while also providing a framework for decision-making and resolving conflicts.

One of the most significant innovations in game mechanics was the introduction of the “d20” system, which allowed for a more randomized approach to resolving conflicts. This system, introduced in “Dungeons & Dragons” (1974), used a 20-sided die (d20) to determine the outcome of actions, replacing the more subjective and arbitrary methods used in earlier games.

Another innovation was the introduction of “skill checks,” which allowed players to test their characters’ abilities against specific challenges. This system, introduced in “Traveller” (1977), provided a more structured approach to problem-solving and decision-making, allowing players to explore a wider range of options and outcomes.

The Influence of Wargames

The development of game mechanics for role-playing games was also influenced by the growth of wargames in the 1960s and 1970s. Wargames, which simulated military battles and tactics, introduced many of the concepts and mechanics that would later be adapted for RPGs. The use of dice, maps, and figures allowed players to engage in simulated combat and tactical decision-making, which would later be incorporated into RPGs.

The Emergence of the Modern RPG

The evolution of game mechanics, along with the influence of wargames and the growth of the tabletop gaming industry, helped to shape the modern RPG. Games like “Dungeons & Dragons” (1974) and “Traveller” (1977) established many of the core concepts and mechanics that would come to define the genre, including character creation, combat, and problem-solving. As the genre continued to evolve, new mechanics and systems were introduced, allowing players to explore a wider range of themes and gameplay styles.

The Rise of Dungeons & Dragons

Key takeaway: The origins of role-playing games can be traced back to the 1970s, with the emergence of the first tabletop role-playing games, such as Chainmail, Dungeons & Dragons, and The Fantasy Game. These early RPGs demonstrated a growing interest in fantasy and science fiction, as well as a desire for more interactive and immersive storytelling experiences. The evolution of game mechanics, the influence of wargames, and the creation of Dungeons & Dragons all contributed to the development of the modern RPG genre. Today, Dungeons & Dragons remains one of the most popular RPGs in the world, with millions of players worldwide.

The Creation of D&D

Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) is widely regarded as the first modern role-playing game (RPG). However, the origins of RPGs can be traced back to several centuries before the creation of D&D. The concept of role-playing dates back to ancient times, with the use of storytelling and theatrical performances in various cultures. In more recent history, RPGs can be seen in the form of tabletop games such as war games and wargaming.

The creation of D&D can be attributed to several individuals, including Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson. Gygax was a science fiction and fantasy author who was fascinated by the concept of tabletop gaming. Arneson was a wargame enthusiast who was interested in adding a more narrative element to his games. Together, they developed the idea for a game that would allow players to assume the roles of characters in a fantasy world.

In 1974, Gygax and Arneson collaborated to create the first edition of D&D. The game was initially designed as a way for players to explore a dungeon and battle monsters. However, the game quickly evolved to include more complex narrative elements, such as character development and storytelling.

D&D quickly gained popularity among hobbyists and became a staple of the tabletop gaming community. The game’s success spawned numerous spin-offs and adaptations, leading to the creation of an entire genre of tabletop RPGs.

Today, D&D remains one of the most popular RPGs in the world, with millions of players worldwide. Its impact on the gaming industry has been significant, and it continues to inspire new generations of gamers to explore their imagination and creativity through role-playing.

The Phenomenon of D&D

The Birth of the Modern RPG

Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) is widely regarded as the first modern role-playing game (RPG). Created by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson in 1974, it revolutionized the gaming industry and set the stage for the development of countless other RPGs. The game’s popularity skyrocketed, and it soon became a cultural phenomenon.

The Influence of Fantasy Literature

D&D drew inspiration from a wide range of sources, including fantasy literature such as J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings and Robert E. Howard’s Conan the Barbarian. These works provided the game with a rich tapestry of mythical creatures, magical items, and epic adventures, which helped to immerse players in a world of endless possibilities.

The Appeal of Imagination and Collaboration

One of the key factors in D&D’s success was its emphasis on imagination and collaboration. Unlike traditional board games, D&D placed an emphasis on storytelling and cooperative play. Players took on the roles of unique characters, each with their own abilities and backstories, and worked together to overcome challenges and defeat foes. This collaborative experience allowed players to engage their creativity and form deep connections with one another, leading to a strong sense of camaraderie and community within the gaming group.

The Evolution of the RPG Genre

The success of D&D sparked a surge of interest in the RPG genre, leading to the creation of numerous other tabletop RPGs. These games built upon the foundations laid by D&D, experimenting with different rulesets, settings, and game mechanics. As a result, the RPG genre has continued to evolve and expand, encompassing a wide range of styles and themes.

The Lasting Impact of D&D

Despite the emergence of countless other RPGs, D&D remains a cornerstone of the genre. Its influence can be seen in both tabletop and video game RPGs, as well as in popular culture more broadly. The game’s enduring popularity is a testament to its innovative design and the power of imagination and collaboration to transport players to new worlds and experiences.

Was Dungeons & Dragons the First RPG?

The Debate on the First RPG

There is a significant debate in the gaming community about whether Dungeons & Dragons was the first role-playing game (RPG). While some argue that it was the pioneer, others suggest that there were earlier games that were similar in concept. In this section, we will explore the arguments for and against Dungeons & Dragons being the first RPG.

Arguments for Dungeons & Dragons as the First RPG

  1. Publication Date: Dungeons & Dragons was first published in 1974, making it one of the earliest RPGs. This, coupled with its immense popularity, has led many to consider it the first RPG.
  2. Game Mechanics: Dungeons & Dragons introduced many of the game mechanics that are now standard in RPGs, such as character classes, levels, and experience points. These mechanics have influenced subsequent RPGs, making Dungeons & Dragons a pivotal game in the development of the genre.
  3. Role-Playing Concept: The name “Dungeons & Dragons” itself implies a focus on role-playing, suggesting that it was the first game to incorporate this aspect into the gaming experience.

Arguments against Dungeons & Dragons as the First RPG

  1. Preceding Games: Some argue that there were earlier games that had similar concepts, such as tabletop wargames like Chainmail (1971) and Dungeons & Dragons’ precursor, Blackmoor (1971). These games featured elements like character creation, combat, and exploration, which suggest that they were also RPGs.
  2. Definition of RPG: The definition of an RPG is not universally agreed upon, with some arguing that Dungeons & Dragons is an RPG due to its emphasis on role-playing, while others argue that it should be defined solely by its mechanics. This subjective definition allows for debate about whether Dungeons & Dragons was the first RPG.
  3. Influence vs. Innovation: While Dungeons & Dragons introduced many game mechanics, it also drew heavily from existing games and literature, such as fantasy novels and wargames. Some argue that it was not as innovative as it is often credited, but rather built upon existing ideas.

In conclusion, the debate over whether Dungeons & Dragons was the first RPG is complex and multifaceted. While it was certainly one of the earliest and most influential RPGs, its status as the first remains a subject of discussion and interpretation.

Comparing Early RPGs to D&D

While Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) is widely considered the first role-playing game (RPG), it is important to compare it to other early RPGs to determine if this claim is accurate. This section will explore some of the earliest RPGs and how they compare to D&D in terms of gameplay mechanics, rules, and overall design.

One of the earliest RPGs was Chainmail, created by Gary Gygax and Jeff Perren in 1971. It was originally designed as a tabletop miniatures wargame, but it contained some elements that could be considered the precursors to RPGs. For example, it included rules for assigning characteristics to individual miniatures and for resolving combat between them.

Another early RPG was Dungeon!, created by Dave Arneson in 1975. It was designed to be played with miniatures and focused on exploring a dungeon, fighting monsters, and finding treasure. The game had a simple character creation system and used a simple dice mechanic for resolving combat and other actions.

Empire of the Petal Throne, created by M. A. R. Barker in 1975, was another early RPG that drew inspiration from wargaming and miniatures. It was set in a fictional world called Tekumel and featured a complex setting with its own history, cultures, and languages. The game used a unique system of percentile dice rolls to resolve actions and included a detailed character creation system.

Comparing these early RPGs to D&D, it is clear that D&D was the first to incorporate all of the elements that we now associate with the genre. While Chainmail had some RPG elements, it was primarily a wargame. Dungeon! was more focused on exploration and combat, but lacked the complex character creation and setting of D&D. Empire of the Petal Throne was more of a hybrid of wargaming and RPGs, but still lacked some of the features that would become standard in D&D, such as a class system and detailed magic system.

Overall, while there were other games that could be considered precursors to RPGs, D&D was the first to bring together all of the elements that define the genre. It is this combination of features that made D&D the iconic RPG that it is today, and has inspired countless other games in the genre.

The Influence of Dungeons & Dragons

The Impact on the Gaming Industry

Dungeons & Dragons, first published in 1974, was not the first role-playing game (RPG) to be created, but it is undoubtedly the most influential. Its impact on the gaming industry can be seen in the countless RPGs that have been inspired by its design, as well as in the countless players who have been captivated by its blend of storytelling, strategy, and social interaction.

One of the key reasons for Dungeons & Dragons’ enduring popularity is its flexibility. The game’s core rules are simple enough to be easily understood, but they also allow for an almost limitless number of variations and customizations. This has made it easy for players to adapt the game to their own preferences and interests, and has helped to ensure that it remains a fresh and engaging experience even after decades of play.

Another factor in Dungeons & Dragons’ success is its emphasis on collaboration and communication. Unlike many other games, which are focused on individual achievement, Dungeons & Dragons is a team activity, with players working together to overcome challenges and tell a shared story. This emphasis on cooperation and communication has made it a popular choice for players of all ages and backgrounds, and has helped to create a strong sense of community among fans of the game.

Despite its age, Dungeons & Dragons has shown no signs of losing its appeal. In fact, the game has experienced a resurgence in recent years, with new editions and spin-offs continuing to attract new players and keep existing ones engaged. Whether it is the original game or one of its many derivatives, Dungeons & Dragons remains a beloved and enduring part of the gaming landscape, and its influence can be seen in countless other games and genres.

The Evolution of RPGs After D&D

After the release of Dungeons & Dragons in 1974, the role-playing game (RPG) genre continued to evolve and expand. While D&D was the first modern RPG, it was far from the last. Many other games were created in the following years, each adding their own unique twists and turns to the genre.

One of the earliest and most influential RPGs to follow in the wake of D&D was Gary Gygax’s Dungeon!, which was released in 1975. This game was designed to be a more streamlined and accessible version of D&D, with simpler rules and a focus on solo play. It was a commercial success and helped to pave the way for other RPGs.

Another important early RPG was Chivalry & Sorcery, which was first released in 1978. This game was designed to be a more realistic and grounded take on the fantasy RPG genre, with a focus on historical accuracy and attention to detail. It was a complex game with a large rulebook, but it remains a beloved classic among RPG fans today.

In the 1980s, the RPG genre really took off with the release of several seminal games. One of the most influential of these was Games Workshop’s Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay, which was released in 1986. This game was designed to be a more narrative-focused RPG, with an emphasis on character development and storytelling. It was a commercial success and helped to popularize the “Old World” setting of Warhammer Fantasy.

Another important RPG from the 1980s was White Wolf’s Vampire: The Masquerade, which was released in 1991. This game was designed to be a more mature and dark take on the fantasy RPG genre, with a focus on political intrigue and personal drama. It was a commercial success and helped to establish White Wolf as a major player in the RPG industry.

Since the 1980s, the RPG genre has continued to evolve and expand, with new games and settings being released all the time. However, the games mentioned above remain some of the most influential and beloved RPGs of all time, and their legacy can still be felt in the modern RPG landscape.

Other Early RPGs Worth Mentioning

Empire of the Petal Throne

  • Empire of the Petal Throne, also known as EPT, was created by John W. Campbell Jr. and first published in 1981.
  • It was heavily influenced by the works of H.P. Lovecraft and was set in a fantasy world inspired by ancient Mayan and Aztec civilizations.
  • The game used a percentile-based system for resolving actions and included detailed rules for character creation, combat, and magic.
  • EPT was considered a more complex and detailed game than Dungeons & Dragons, with a greater emphasis on storytelling and character development.
  • Despite its popularity among gamers, EPT never achieved the same level of mainstream success as Dungeons & Dragons.
  • Today, EPT is still played by a dedicated community of fans who appreciate its unique setting and gameplay mechanics.

Metamorphosis Alpha

The Creation of Metamorphosis Alpha

Metamorphosis Alpha was created in 1976 by Jim Ward, who was a co-founder of the game company, GDW (Gaming Design Workshop). Ward was heavily influenced by science fiction novels, particularly those of Frank Herbert, and aimed to create a game that captured the essence of these works. The game’s central concept was a futuristic space station that had been overrun by mutants, with players taking on the roles of survivors trying to navigate this dangerous environment.

Mechanics and Themes

The game’s mechanics were heavily influenced by the popular game of wargaming at the time, with a focus on strategic movement and combat. Players were given detailed descriptions of their characters, including attributes such as strength, dexterity, and intelligence, which could be increased or decreased through play. The game also introduced a unique mechanic known as “Fate Points,” which allowed players to influence the outcome of events and create a more personalized experience.

Metamorphosis Alpha also explored themes of survival, resource management, and the struggle for power in a post-apocalyptic world. The game’s setting was rich and detailed, with a deep backstory and intricate world-building that immersed players in the gritty reality of the space station.

Legacy and Influence

Metamorphosis Alpha was a pioneering game in the RPG genre, introducing innovative mechanics and exploring themes that would become staples of the genre. Its focus on survival and resource management laid the groundwork for future games like Dungeons & Dragons, which drew heavily from its mechanics and setting. The game’s legacy can also be seen in the countless space-faring RPGs that have followed in its wake, many of which have drawn inspiration from its richly detailed world and unique gameplay elements.

The Importance of Recognizing RPG History

The Evolution of Game Design

The Earliest RPGs

The roots of role-playing games (RPGs) can be traced back to tabletop games like Chivalry and Kings and Things, which were created in the 1960s and 1970s. These games focused on open-ended narratives and allowed players to create characters with unique traits and abilities.

Wargames, which simulated military battles, also played a significant role in the development of RPGs. The popularity of wargames led to the creation of games like Dungeons & Dragons, which combined elements of wargames and tabletop RPGs.

The Rise of the Indie RPG Movement

In the 1990s and 2000s, a new wave of indie RPGs emerged, challenging the dominance of established RPGs like Dungeons & Dragons. These games, such as Apocalypse World and The Shadow of Yesterday, experimented with new mechanics and narrative techniques, leading to a resurgence in interest in the genre.

The Influence of Video Games

The rise of video games in the 1980s and 1990s also had a significant impact on the development of RPGs. Games like Final Fantasy and The Elder Scrolls series borrowed elements from traditional tabletop RPGs, such as character progression and open-ended exploration, and adapted them to a digital platform.

The Continuing Evolution of Game Design

As RPGs continue to evolve, designers are constantly experimenting with new mechanics and narrative techniques. From the rise of live-action RPGs to the continued popularity of tabletop RPGs, the genre remains a vital and ever-changing part of the gaming world.

The Importance of Understanding RPG Origins

  • Recognizing the origins of role-playing games (RPGs) is crucial for understanding their evolution and development over time.
  • Understanding the origins of RPGs helps to identify the influences and inspirations that led to the creation of various games.
  • It is important to note that the concept of role-playing has been around for centuries, long before the creation of modern RPGs.
  • Understanding the historical context of RPGs can also provide insight into the social and cultural factors that have shaped the industry.
  • Recognizing the contributions of early RPGs and their creators is essential for appreciating the rich history and diversity of the genre.
  • Furthermore, understanding the origins of RPGs can help to dispel misconceptions and stereotypes about the hobby.
  • In summary, recognizing the origins of RPGs is crucial for understanding their development, influences, and cultural significance.

The Enduring Legacy of RPGs

The role-playing game (RPG) genre has left an indelible mark on the gaming industry, captivating the hearts and minds of gamers for decades. The origins of RPGs can be traced back to the early 1970s, when tabletop RPGs such as Dungeons & Dragons first emerged. Since then, the genre has evolved and expanded, giving rise to a diverse array of RPG titles across various platforms. The enduring legacy of RPGs can be seen in their influence on game design, storytelling, and the broader cultural landscape.

One of the most significant contributions of RPGs to the gaming industry is their impact on game design. Early RPGs, such as Dungeons & Dragons, established many of the design principles that have since become staples of the genre. These include the use of character creation systems, in which players create unique avatars to represent themselves within the game world, and the use of a game master (GM) to guide the story and control non-player characters (NPCs). These mechanics have since been refined and adapted to fit a wide range of gameplay styles, from the turn-based combat of classic RPGs to the real-time action of modern RPGs.

In addition to their influence on game design, RPGs have also had a profound impact on storytelling in the gaming industry. Many of the narrative elements that have become commonplace in modern games, such as complex characters, morally ambiguous plotlines, and branching story paths, can be traced back to the RPG genre. RPGs often feature intricate world-building and rich, detailed lore, which has inspired many game developers to craft immersive and engaging stories for their players. The genre’s focus on player choice and agency has also paved the way for more interactive and replayable narratives, allowing players to shape the course of the story through their actions and decisions.

Finally, the legacy of RPGs extends beyond the gaming industry, influencing popular culture and the broader cultural landscape. RPGs have inspired countless works of fiction, from novels and films to television shows and comics. They have also given rise to a thriving community of players and creators, who have built entire worlds and universes within the genre. This vibrant community has fostered a shared love for the RPG genre, leading to a wealth of fan-created content, such as fan art, fan fiction, and modding communities.

In conclusion, the enduring legacy of RPGs can be seen in their influence on game design, storytelling, and popular culture. Their impact on the gaming industry has been profound, inspiring countless titles and innovations across various platforms. As the genre continues to evolve and expand, it is clear that RPGs will remain a beloved and integral part of the gaming landscape for years to come.

The Continuing Evolution of the Genre

The evolution of role-playing games (RPGs) is an ongoing process that has been shaped by numerous factors, including technological advancements, changing player preferences, and the introduction of new game mechanics. This continuous evolution has resulted in a diverse range of RPGs that cater to different audiences and playstyles.

One of the key factors driving the evolution of RPGs is the introduction of new technologies. The advent of computer graphics and sound has enabled developers to create more immersive and visually stunning RPGs, which has attracted a wider audience to the genre. Additionally, the rise of mobile gaming has led to the development of RPGs that are designed specifically for touchscreen devices, offering players a more accessible and convenient gaming experience.

Another factor that has influenced the evolution of RPGs is the changing preferences of players. As gamers have become more discerning and demanding, RPGs have evolved to incorporate more complex storylines, deeper character development, and more varied gameplay mechanics. Many modern RPGs also place a greater emphasis on player choice and agency, allowing players to shape the course of the game in meaningful ways.

Finally, the evolution of RPGs has also been influenced by the introduction of new game mechanics. For example, the rise of the massively multiplayer online RPG (MMORPG) has led to the development of games that are designed to be played online with thousands of other players. This has introduced new challenges and opportunities for game developers, who must create engaging and dynamic worlds that can accommodate large numbers of players simultaneously.

Overall, the continued evolution of the RPG genre is a testament to its enduring popularity and the innovative spirit of its developers. As the genre continues to evolve, it will be interesting to see how new technologies, changing player preferences, and new game mechanics shape the future of RPGs.

FAQs

1. What is a role-playing game (RPG)?

A role-playing game (RPG) is a type of game where players assume the roles of fictional characters and take on their traits, abilities, and personalities. They typically involve a narrative or story that unfolds as the players make choices and interact with the game world.

2. When was the first role-playing game created?

The first role-playing game is widely considered to be “Dungeons & Dragons” (D&D), which was created by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson in 1974. However, there were earlier games that included some elements of role-playing, such as “Dungeon!” (1975) and “Fantasy Players” (1968).

3. Was Dungeons & Dragons the first tabletop RPG?

No, Dungeons & Dragons was not the first tabletop RPG. It was actually the third tabletop RPG created, after “Dungeon!” (1975) and “Fantasy Players” (1968). However, it was the first RPG to gain widespread popularity and is often credited with creating the modern tabletop RPG genre.

4. What makes Dungeons & Dragons unique compared to other RPGs?

Dungeons & Dragons is unique in that it introduced several innovative game mechanics, such as character levels, experience points, and randomized encounters. It also incorporated elements of fantasy fiction, such as magic spells and mythical creatures, which have become staples of the RPG genre. Additionally, the game’s emphasis on player creativity and imagination has allowed it to evolve and adapt to new ideas and playstyles over the years.

5. What impact did Dungeons & Dragons have on the gaming industry?

Dungeons & Dragons had a significant impact on the gaming industry by popularizing the tabletop RPG genre and paving the way for the creation of numerous other RPGs. It also introduced several game mechanics and concepts that have been adopted by other games, including video games and board games. The game’s influence can be seen in various forms of media, including books, movies, and television shows, and it continues to be a beloved and influential game to this day.

The History of Original Dungeons & Dragons

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